Chris Potter at SFJAZZ

This evening I went with my two jazz-loving parents to see Chris Potter at SFJAZZ. Often times my mother will take me and my father to see jazz, but tonight I was taking them. I’ve been interested in seeing Chris Potter for a while. I think I first became aware of him through Snarky Puppy’s social media account which reposted a video of him playing. I was captivated by the power of his tenor sax.

I began to listen to Potter’s recorded work and was blown away by his 2002 album “Traveling Mercies.” The album is at once mystical, wild and free while also refined in its melodic beauty. I loved each track on its own, but it especially blew me away as an album. I felt like I had been waiting for that jazz record to lift me up and take me away for a long time. “Traveling Mercies” features Potter not only on tenor and soprano sax but also on alto flute and bass clarinet. Often you’ll even hear Potter overdub himself signing and playing multiple different instruments. The record also features pianist Kevin Hays, bassist Scott Colley and drummer Bill Stewart. John Scofield contributes cool and tight solos on three tracks and Adam Rogers adds nylon-string and slide on two other tracks. The album sounds undeniably modern and often quite strange with unique meters, but it is kept grounded by the power of Potter’s tenor sax which is weaved throughout. It is a remarkably beautiful and thought provoking record.

Next I listened to Potter’s 2001 album “Gratitude.” Different from “Traveling Mercies,” each track on “Gratitude” literally shows its gratitude for a different jazz legend in its title: “The Source (for John Coltrane),” “Shadow (for Joe Henderson),” “Sun King (for Sonny Rollins),” and so on and so forth. Potter honors Coltrane, Henderson, Rollins, Eddie Harris, Wayne Shorter, Michael Becker, Joe Lovano, Lester Young, Coleman Hawkins, Charlie Parker, Ornette Coleman, and “The Current Generation” in each of his song titles. After listening to “Traveling Mercies” the album felt a bit timid. I guess it was not fair of me to listen to the newer record first. However, what is undeniable on the record is Potter’s virtuosity on the tenor sax. The record features Hayes on keys and Colley on bass again and also Brian Blade on drums (!!! I love Brian Blade !!!).

Chris Potter did not disappoint. He played all new music from his freshly released album, “The Dreamer is the Dream,” with pianist David Virelles, drummer Marcus Gilmore, and bassist Ben Street (Joe Martin plays bass on the album). Every member of the quartet shined and the music was exquisite. It was exactly what I was hoping for: a step even further from “Traveling Mercies,” with wild free solos, adventurous melodies, and crazy meters.

Potter is an extraordinarily creative composer using a synth to start a few of the songs with mystical chimes and the beautiful sounds of rain and the earth. This type of experimentation with electronic sounds isn’t exactly common in the particular jazz world Potter inhabits, and I could see skepticism on the faces of some around me. However, Potter uses the synth to make a genius point.

The mystical electronic earth sounds are soon overtaken, slowly, by a rapturous and powerful piano and a primitive drum. Soon a wild bassline comes in. Before you know it the synth has gone completely silent, and it has been overtaken by piano, drums and bass. And then you start to realize that those electronic sounds never sounded entirely different from the live sounds of the instruments. And then the huge sound of Potter’s sax blows into your ears and through your body, waking you up and making you remember what life is about.

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